New strategies and approaches needed to cope with growing burden of brain diseases

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

(Oslo, Monday, 1 July, 2019) New strategies for preventing and coping with the burden of brain diseases were outlined today at the 5th EAN Congress.

Prevention of brain diseases, the provision of equal treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation, as well as increased research and expertise, is vital in providing patients with optimal outcomes.”

— Professor Anne Hege Aamodt

OSLO, NORWAY, June 30, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Professor Anne Hege Aamodt, President of the Norwegian Neurological Association, presented The Norwegian Brain Health Strategy 2018-2024 to attendees at the congress. Norway are the first country in Europe to launch a national brain health strategy, which has four overarching aims:

1. Good lifelong brain health, prevention and quality of life
2. The provision of user-centred care, as well as support for relatives
3. The organisation of holistic care from multi-disciplinary teams
4. Ensuring adequate knowledge and quality through research and innovation

Brain diseases now account for 10% of the global burden of disease. Dementia, one of the most common brain diseases, now affects around 50 million people worldwide with 10 million new cases every year. By 2030, it’s estimated that the number of people living with dementia will reach 82 million and this is expected to increase to 152 million by 2050.

“Brain diseases affect a wide range of people in all stages of life and, as people are living for longer, greater numbers now live with a range of brain diseases”, explained Professor Aamodt. “Prevention of brain diseases, the provision of equal treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation, as well as increased research and expertise, is absolutely vital in providing patients with optimal outcomes. This strategy will help to facilitate this for a number of brain diseases, including dementia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and stroke-related conditions.”

Initiatives outlined in the plan are now underway, which include the funding of a €20 million National Clinical Research Centre devoted to the clinical treatment of severe diseases such as MS, dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In addition, the Norwegian Research Council will also receive an additional €5 million for strengthening research and innovation in neurological conditions.

The Norwegian Neurological Association and the Norwegian Directorate of Health are working to action further objectives outlined in the plan, which is being seen as a model template for other European countries to follow.

Professor Aamodt adds, “We believe that this national strategy should be replicated and implemented across Europe, tailored for each country. The continent will undergo major societal transformations, such as the ageing population, that will impact on brain diseases and health services must adapt to these changes.”

Following the launch of the Norwegian Brain Health Strategy, EAN and European Federation of Neurological Associations (EFNA) are also calling for a European Brain Health Plan raise public awareness of brain diseases, lobby governments and integrate the best science to improve outcomes for both patients and society.

Also at EAN 2019: Focusing on the burden of stroke and dementia

Professor Vladimir Hachinski, world-renowned stroke expert, stressed during the EAN Congress that stroke accounts for 42% of neurological disease, compared to 10% for dementia and that many cases of dementia could be prevented by preventing stroke.

Professor Hachinski said the quest to find a cure for Alzheimer’s in the past 40 years had focused on the amyloid/tau plaque hypothesis, but although this research had improved understanding of the dementia process, this ‘monorail’ approach had so far failed to yield a single disease-modifying drug.

Professor Hachinski stated “The good news is that stroke is 90% potentially preventable through the control of risk factors. Stroke and dementia share the same treatable risk factors and their control is associated with a decrease in stroke and some dementias. Additionally, intensive control of risk factors and enhancement of protective factors improve cognition.”

“Anticoagulation treatment of atrial fibrillation patients decreases their chance of developing dementia by 48 %. Preliminary data suggests that treating blood pressure to a target of 120mmHg systolic, compared to a target of 140mmHg, decreases the chances of mild cognitive impairment by 19 %.”

Professor Hachinski said neurological disorders are now responsible for the largest number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs – a combined index of early mortality and years spent in disability). He added that the introduction of a stroke strategy in Ontario, Canada, which included building stroke units, stroke prevention clinics and campaigns to control risk factors, helped decrease the number of strokes by 32% over 12 years, with a 7% reduction in the incidence of dementia.

He stressed that whilst advancing age, genetic factors and family history couldn’t be changed, many other risk factors for stroke could be modified with physical activity, antihypertensive drugs, following a Mediterranean diet, an active lifestyle and taking statins to lower cholesterol.

Professor Hachinski concluded: “Neurological disorders represent the leading cause of DALYs. More than half result from stroke and dementia, which are both preventable to different degrees. We need new vistas and approaches to grasp the opportunity of preventing stroke and some dementias, beginning now.”

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Press Enquiries:

For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 7732 499170.

About the Experts:

Professor Anne Hege Aamodt is the President of the Norwegian Neurological Association
Professor Vladimir Hachinski is a Professor of neurology at Western Ontario University, Ontario, Canada

EAN – The Home of Neurology:

The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. Founded in 2014, through the merger of two European neurological societies, EAN represents the interests of more than 45,000 individual members and 47 national institutional members from across the continent. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology.

References:

1. EAN/EFNA – Norwegian Brain Strategy: a plan to strengthen brain health in Europe. 5TH European Academy of Neurology Congress, Oslo, Norway
2. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 ( 2018) Lancet 32: 10159: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)32279-7/fulltext
3. World Health Organisation, Dementia: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/dementia
4. Friberg L et al(2018). Less dementia with oral anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Eur Heart J 39;453-460 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29077849
5. The SPRINT MIND Investigators for the SPRINT Research Group. Effect of intensive vs standard blood pressure control on probable dementia. A randomized clinical trial. (2019) JAMA 321: 553-561.
6. Sposato LA, Kapral MK, et al. (2015) Declining Incidence of stroke and dementia: coincidence or prevention opportunity? JAMA Neurol 72: 1529-1531. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26658969

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Statin use reduces mortality and stroke risk in dementia patients, new study shows

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

(Oslo, Monday, 01 July, 2019) Use of statins is significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of mortality in dementia patients, research has shown.

Our results are encouraging and suggest that patients with dementia benefit from statins to a similar extent than patients without dementia.”

— Dr Sara Garcia-Ptacek

OSLO, NORWAY, June 30, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — The study, which analysed 44,920 Swedish dementia patients from the Swedish Dementia Registry between 2008-2015, found users of statins had a 22% lower risk of all-cause death compared to matched non-users.

The research, presented today at the 5th EAN Congress, also demonstrated that statin users had a 23% reduction in the risk of stroke, which is three times more likely in patients with mild dementia and seven times more likely in those with severe dementia.

The protective effect of statins on survival were strong for patients younger than 75 years (27% reduction) and in men (26% reduction) but women and older patients also benefited (17% and 20% reduction respectively). Patients with vascular dementia – the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease – also saw a 29% lower mortality risk.

“Survival in patients in dementia is variable, and previous studies have identified many factors associated with survival and risk of stroke in these patients”, commented first author Bojana Petek, MD, from the University Medical Center Ljubljana, Slovenia and the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. “However, the effect of statins on these two outcomes is not clear. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between the use of statins on the risk of death and stroke in patients diagnosed with dementia.”

Commenting on their research, lead author Dr Sara Garcia-Ptacek from the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, stated, “This is a cohort study, which means patients were not randomized to a treatment like they would be in a clinical trial. For this reason, we can only show an association, and not definitely prove that statins caused this decline in mortality. However, our results are encouraging and suggest that patients with dementia benefit from statins to a similar extent than patients without dementia.”

Affecting around 10 million people in Europe, dementia is the leading cause of dependency and disability among older people across the continent4. The number of cases is expected to double by 2030, largely due to the ageing population. The prevalence of dementia increases exponentially with age, affecting 5% of the population over 65, and up to 50% by 90 years of age.

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Press Enquiries:

For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 7732 499170.

About the Expert:

Bojana Petek, MD, is from Division of Neurogeriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden and the Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Dr. Sara Garcia-Ptacek, the Senior Author, is from the Division of Clinical Geriatric, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.

EAN – The Home of Neurology:

The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. Founded in 2014, through the merger of two European neurological societies, EAN represents the interests of more than 45,000 individual members and 47 national institutional members from across the continent. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology and will bring together more than 6,000 neurologists and related scientists to the biggest general neurology conference in Europe.

In Oslo, Norway, from June 29 to July 2, there will be an exchange of knowledge and promotion of best practice, with a focus on the main theme of neuroinflammation. The EAN Congress will also cover all neurological diseases and disorders, including the big 7: epilepsy, stroke, headache, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement disorders, neuromuscular disorders.

References:

1. Statins, risk of death and stroke in patients with dementia – a registry-based study. Petek B, Villa-Lopez M, Winblad B, Kramberger MG, von Euler M, Xu H, Eriksdotter M, Garcia-Ptacek S, presented at the 5th Congress of International Neurology in Oslo.
2. The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem): www.svedem.se
3. Journal of Internal Medicine. 2017. Management of acute ischaemic stroke in patients with dementia. Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/joim.12588
4. WHO Europe, Dementia. Available at: http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/noncommunicable-diseases/mental-health/areas-of-work/dementia

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Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) explained in a new article by medical consultant Dr. Sohail Aman

Sohail Aman, MD, Maryland and Alabama

Sohail Aman, MD, Maryland and Alabama

Dr Sohail Aman, Medical Consultant in Maryland and Alabama

Dr Sohail Aman, Medical Consultant in Maryland and Alabama

Sohail Aman, MD, Maryland and Alabama

Sohail Aman, MD, Maryland and Alabama

Dr. Sohail Aman, Maryland and Alabama

Dr. Sohail Aman, Maryland and Alabama

Sohail Aman, MD, Maryland and Alabama

Sohail Aman, MD, Maryland and Alabama

Dr. Sohail Aman’s new article details the symptoms, causes and treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

The complexity of the Alzheimer’s disease makes it untreatable and unpreventable. However, the medicines prescribed can be helpful in treating the individual symptoms…”

— Sohail Aman, MD, medical consultant

MOBILE, ALABAMA, UNITED STATES, June 30, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia, is a neurological disorder that occurs due to continuous degeneration of the brain cells. This incurable and irreversible disease hampers a patient’s cognitive and physical abilities. A person suffering from Alzheimer’s disease would eventually lose all memory and even cease to perform everyday tasks independently.

Medical Consultant Sohail Aman has published an article on this issue, which is available on his blog at https://sohailamanmd.home.blog/

As a progressive disease, it worsens with time. Alzheimer’s develops slowly in the beginning but gets fatal as it enters advanced stages and various associated health concerns like dehydration, infections start playing a role.

Signs and Symptoms

Some common signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are:

1. Memory Loss
Earlier symptoms may include forgetfulness or the inability to remember recent conversations or occurrences. The patient may also face difficulty in processing and communicating thoughts. As the memory loss worsens, the patient may keep on repeating something, forget appointments, unable to maintain his check books, and balance accounts, fail to identify people or objects, lose possessions or even get lost himself.

2. Sluggish Reasoning and Decision-Making Process
People suffering from Alzheimer’s find it particularly challenging to focus reason and multitask. With time, the patient’s decision-making skills will get poorer and the responses towards everyday issues will get slower.

3. Difficulty in Routine Activities
An Alzheimer’s patient struggles with everyday tasks. At an advanced stage, routine chores like eating, dressing and bathing may also become extremely arduous.

4. Behavioral Changes

A change in behavior is a significant symptom. The patient experiences mood swings, depression, insomnia, and aggressiveness. Social skills deteriorate and the patients feel surrounded by mistrust and delusions.

Causes

Definite causes of Alzheimer’s disease remain unknown to date. A mere 1% of patients have been observed to get the disease through genetics or their personal habits. A family history of Alzheimer’s disease increases the risk. Head traumas, unhealthy sleep patterns, and old age are also considered as possible causes in some studies. It has been found that the part of the brain responsible to retain and control memory, the hippocampus, undergoes neurological decay. A considerable amount of neurons die by the time the early signs of the disease start to manifest.
The disease spreads in different areas of the cerebral cortex. Two brain proteins are found to play a major role in causing the disease.

* Plaques
The remnants of larger proteins, Beta-amyloids, accumulate in the brain over time causing the decay of brain cells. The dead cells and bits of proteins combine to form plaque which impedes the functioning of the brain.
* Tangles
The neurological transport system is largely supported by Tau proteins. These special proteins restructure themselves as neuro-fibrillary tangles which are lethal to the cells and cause the transport system to collapse in an Alzheimer’s infected brain.

Treatment

The complexity of the Alzheimer’s disease makes it untreatable and unpreventable. However, the medicines prescribed can be helpful in treating the individual symptoms and decreasing the rate of cellular degeneration. Cholinesterase inhibitors are the type of drugs prescribed in early stages of the Alzheimer’s disease. According to the studies, these medicines help preserve a chemical called acetylcholine in the brain which prevents memory loss to some degree. Unfortunately, the inhibitors lose their effectiveness as the disease grows.

About Dr. Sohail Aman

Dr. Sohail Aman is a Consultant in Internal Medicine in Mobile, Alabama. He graduated from Medical School in 1992, and has completed several post-graduate training programs in internal medicine and a year in neurology training. He also holds a LMCC (Licentiate medical Council of Canada) certification and is a Fellow American College of Physicians, participates as a preceptor in medical Students clinical training program.

Website: https://SohailAman.com
Blog: https://sohailamanmd.home.blog/
Professional Profile: https://medicogazette.com/sohail-aman%2C-md-alabama
Professional Profile: https://hippocratesguild.com/sohail-aman%2C-md-alabama
News: https://hype.news/dr-sohail-aman-us/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sohail-aman-39317b45

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UW Medicine: The good news on Alzheimer’s disease


Source: EIN Presswire

New study reveals biological toll on brain function of Holocaust survivors

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

Stress of surviving the Holocaust has shown a lifelong and lasting negative impact on survivors’ brain structure, potentially impacting their offspring.

The impact of surviving the Holocaust on brain function is significant. We revealed substantial differences in the brain structures involved in the processing of emotion, memory and social cognition.”

— Professor Ivan Rektor

OSLO, NORWAY, June 30, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Stress of surviving the Holocaust has shown a lifelong and lasting negative impact on survivors’ brain structure, as well as potentially impacting their offspring and grandchildren, a new study shows.

The novel research, presented today at the 5th European Academy of Neurology Congress, found that surviving the Holocaust had a life-long psychological and biological effect with grey matter reduction affecting the parts of their brain responsible for stress response, memory, motivation, emotion, learning, and behaviour.

Utilising MRI scanning, the study looked at the brain function of 56 people with an average age of 79-80, comparing 28 Holocaust survivors with 28 controls who do not have a personal or family history of the Holocaust. Survivors showed a significantly decreased volume of grey matter in the brain compared with controls of a similar age who had not been directly exposed via personal or family history to the Holocaust.

The study differentiated between survivors above and below the age of 12 years in 1945 and found that the reduction in grey matter was significantly more expressed in younger survivors, which may be attributed to the higher vulnerability to a stressful environment of the developing brain in childhood. In line with previous research, the study found a reduction of grey matter in areas of the brain associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in combat veterans and those suffering early-life stress experience. However, the research also showed that reductions in grey matter in other areas of the brain went far beyond what had previously been found in those suffering PTSD; with survivors suffering a higher level of stress but also higher levels of post-traumatic growth. Despite having suffered extreme stress the survivors reported that they were satisfied with their personal and professional life after the war.

The researchers are now investigating the impact of the Holocaust on survivors’ children and grandchildren, and early results in survivors’ children show reduced connectivity between structures of the brain involved in the processing of emotion and memory. Further research is set to identify biomarkers of stress resilience and post-traumatic growth and to determine whether transmission to offspring is based on behavioural and psychological factors or on genetic factors.

Commenting on their research findings, Professor Ivan Rektor, a neurologist from Brno, Czech Republic, explained, “After more than 70 years the impact of surviving the Holocaust on brain function is significant. We revealed substantial differences in the brain structures involved in the processing of emotion, memory and social cognition, in higher level of stress but also of post-traumatic growth between Holocaust survivors and controls. Early results show this is also the case in children of survivors too.”

“Our hope is that these findings and our ongoing research will allow us to understand more about the effect of these experiences in order to focus therapy to support survivors’ and their descendants’ resilience and growth. We may also reveal strategies that Holocaust survivors used to cope with trauma during their later lives and to pass on their experience to further generations”, added Professor Rektor.

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Press Enquiries:

For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 7732 499170.

Further Information:

For further information on the Holocaust, visit the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust: https://www.hmd.org.uk/learn-about-the-holocaust-and-genocides/the-holocaust/

About the Expert:

Professor Ivan Rektor is the Head of the Research Centre at the Centre for Neuroscience, Masaryk University.

EAN – The Home of Neurology:

The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. Founded in 2014, through the merger of two European neurological societies, EAN represents the interests of more than 45,000 individual members and 47 national institutional members from across the continent. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology and will bring together more than 6,000 neurologists and related scientists to the biggest general neurology conference in Europe.

In Oslo, Norway, from June 29 to July 2, there will be an exchange of knowledge and promotion of best practice, with a focus on the main theme of neuroinflammation. The EAN Congress will also cover all neurological diseases and disorders, including the big 7: epilepsy, stroke, headache, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement disorders, neuromuscular disorders.

References:

1. Life-long effects of extreme stress on brain structures – a holocaust survivor MRI study. M. Fnaskova, P. Říha, I. Rektor, presented at the 5th Congress of International Neurology in Oslo.

Luke Paskins
European Academy of Neurology (EAN)
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Source: EIN Presswire

Early treatment is the key to beating Alzheimer’s disease in later life

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

World-renowned neuroscientist Professor Bart De Strooper will deliver the ‘Brain Prize Lecture’ today at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress.

Scientists need to shift their focus to the earlier stage of the disease and think about the cellular environment in which the disease develops”

— Professor Bart De Strooper

OSLO, NORWAY, June 29, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — World-renowned neuroscientist Professor Bart De Strooper will deliver the prestigious ‘Brain Prize Lecture’ today at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress in Oslo, Norway, and outline why we need to intervene much earlier if we want to protect people against the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in later life.

This approach is based on decades of research on the causes of hereditary forms of Alzheimer’s disease and, unfortunately, disappointing clinical trial outcomes so far.

Over the past decades, Professor De Strooper has made important contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease. This included uncovering that gene mutations in presenilin – part of the γ-secretase protein complex that ‘cuts’ other proteins into smaller pieces – lead to the production of abnormal amyloid to form plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

His discoveries mark breakthrough findings in the dementia field, furthering the understanding of how Alzheimer’s disease may begin and provide potential new mechanisms to target with drug therapies in the future.

Professor De Strooper, Director of the UK Dementia Research Institute, London and group leader at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research, Leuven, was awarded the Lundbeck Foundation Brain Prize for his work in this area last year and explained that understanding how these mutations drive dementia is important in developing new therapies. “We need to understand what is going on in the brain and how the brain operates while these changes occur”, he commented. “Treating amyloid at a very early stage could protect against symptoms later on and we must target these processes if we want to make the most effective treatments.”

The amyloid hypothesis works on the assumption that the accumulation of peptide amyloid-β plaques is the main cause of Alzheimer’s disease by triggering neurogenerative processes. This leads to the loss of memory and cognitive ability and has guided research into dementia treatments for the past 25 years.

Professor De Strooper commented, “For decades we have studied Alzheimer’s disease in its final stages. We now know that the disease process in the brain can start decades before the first symptoms arise. Studying the cognitive abnormalities in Alzheimer’s disease patients has indeed taught us a great deal about the disease, but we are always looking at an advanced stage or even post-mortem. You could compare this to studying cancer but only reviewing the metastatic disease, completely missing the stage where the disease actually originates and begins to spread. Needless to say, in both cases the chance of clinical success and making a meaningful change in treatment for patients, would be in those earlier stages.”

Trials for new Alzheimer’s drugs have, until now, often been tested in patients with advanced disease and it is therefore difficult to change the disease course. Professor De Strooper argues that we need to understand what happens before the plaques form in the cellular phase. “Scientists need to shift their focus to the earlier stage of the disease and think about the cellular environment in which the disease develops”, he observed.

Although budgets have been cut in dementia research, Professor De Strooper added there is still room for plenty of optimism due to the discoveries made on the neurodegenerative process. “Even though the situation is more complex than previously anticipated, if we compare the budgets and publication numbers in this disease area with those for cancer, it is simply not true that the success rate is exceptionally low. We just need to continue to invest heavily in new, innovative research to provide patients with optimal outcomes.”

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Press Enquiries:
For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 1444 811099.

About the Expert:

Professor Bart De Strooper is Director of the UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI) in London, UK, Professor of Alzheimer's Disease at University College London, UK, Professor of Molecular Medicine at the University of Leuven, Belgium) and Group Leader (and former Director) at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research, Leuven, Belgium.

His scientific awards include a Brain Prize (2018), a European Grand Prix for Research (2018), and a Potamkin Prize (2002).

EAN – The Home of Neurology:

The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. Founded in 2014, through the merger of two European neurological societies, EAN represents the interests of more than 45,000 individual members and 47 national institutional members from across the continent. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology and will bring together more than 6,000 neurologists and related scientists to the biggest general neurology conference in Europe.

In Oslo, Norway, from June 29 to July 2, there will be an exchange of knowledge and promotion of best practice, with a focus on the main theme of neuroinflammation. The EAN Congress will also cover all neurological diseases and disorders, including the big 7: epilepsy, stroke, headache, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement disorders, neuromuscular disorders.

References:

1. The Brain Prize Lecture: The prodromal, cellular phase of Alzheimer’s Disease: towards a novel understanding of the disorder. Presented on Sunday, 30 June, 2019, at The 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress in Oslo, Norway

2. Alzheimer’s-Causing Mutations Shift Aβ Length by Destabilizing γ-Secretase-Aβn Interactions: https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(17)30811-5

Luke Paskins
European Academy of Neurology (EAN)
+44 1444 811099
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Precision in Healthcare to be Advanced by Immersive Learning in Middle East

UAE medical students set to learn thru immersion

UAE medical students set to learn thru immersion

3d organon munfarid 2

Virtual Reality allows positive developments in both performances and perceived capabilities of medical aspirants

3D Organon Anatomy Partner with Munfaird for Middle East

3D Organon Anatomy Partner with Munfaird for Middle East

Virtual Reality based Medical Learning by 3D Organon with Munfarid in Middle East

Virtual Reality based Medical Learning by 3D Organon with Munfarid in Middle East

How the aging medical learning will have a renovation through VR–Realistic Immersive Learning

The anticipation was real to save a critical patient, such tools help us practice the most difficult scenarios and be better prepared for real-life cases”

— Najla Naser, Student at Gulf Medical University

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES, June 29, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — As accelerated digitization has changed skill requirements, the workforce of tomorrow demands more active and ongoing approach to training and learning. Virtual Reality–the flag bearer of immersive learning has created an observant shift in the technological mainframe and has added new ways of communication, education and interaction. The whole idea of forging extended reality or replication of possible scenarios through VR is capable to simulate easy and practical learning.

IMMERSIVE LEARNING IS TRANSFORMING EDUCATION AND TRAINING PRACTICES ACROSS THE REGION
UAE has advanced in its operations to include immersive technologies in business, healthcare, and education, since 2015, in order to learn and derive the impact of VR in lowering the cost, reducing time to market, increase profits, and promote competitiveness. His Highness, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum shares his thoughts on UAE’s innovation progress: “UAE has adopted innovation as an institutional approach and a culture of the society that aims at developing its human factor as well as government institutions, as part of its drive to build a sustainable future.”

UAE’s continuous strides in uplifting the economic power balance in the world today can be observed in market predictions announced by IDC or International Data Corporation, which claims that by 2020, the UAE's VR and AR market will jump to $ 6 Billion. Motivated by promising predictions, established UAE universities like Mohammed bin Rashid University are slowly fabricating radical and attested concepts of immersive learning into their course curriculums. Dr. Amer Ahmad Sharif, CEO of Dubai Healthcare City Authority-Education (DHCE) and Vice-Chancellor of Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences (MBRU) quotes: “Our commitment to innovation and excellence only starts here. We’re inspiring a new generation of healthcare professionals who will impact the world with groundbreaking discoveries.” By placing students in an interactive learning environment, a smart transition from benign learning to practical learning will eventually educate them to adapt to any uncontrolled-real-life scenarios.

Dr. Sana Farid (X-Reality and AI Strategist, Munfarid) shared her views during an interview “There are infinite business applications of VR, from test drives to remote surgeries, but the most required and relevant potential of VR lies in healthcare, specifically in terms of exploration, learning forecasts and dissecting complex body engineering. By using virtual reality dynamic prototypes, the ability to depict certain organ movements becomes easier, which is a big breakthrough. ”

VR THROUGH ITS IMMERSIVE LEARNING HOLDS THE ABILITY TO DISSOLVE VARIOUS HEALTHCARE ISSUES
The advancements in Virtual Reality has enhanced scientific experiences and as a result, VR has unlocked the potential of improvising patient education, medical health treatments, fixing brain discordance, medical storytelling, drug visualization and improvised methods to learn body engineering. Virtual reality is proficient in assisting doctors and medical trainees in exploration which was earlier limited to rigid sources.

VR FOR MEDICAL AND NURSING EDUCATION
Virtual Reality allows positive developments in both performances and perceived capabilities of medical aspirants. OXFORD continues to support immersive learning methodologies and has readily adopted VR and AR (Augmented Reality) to provide its students with a new way to increase retention of information. Contributing to the global recognition and adoption of VR, and to best describe the applicability of VR and AR in education and research, the Middle East has progressed in its VR deployment strategy. Physiotherapy companies in UAE are already advancing their technological facilities by incorporating certain concepts of VR and AR for the rehabilitation of cerebral palsy, stroke and motor delay patients.

A student at Queen’s University in Canada, Samantha, comments on her VR training session: “The anticipation was real to save a critical patient, such tools help us practice the most difficult scenarios and be better prepared for real-life cases”. With students now being able to realistically simulate a wide range of clinical solutions, the probability of errors becomes less and the accomplishment rate of practical results gets accelerated.

MIDDLE EAST CONVERGES ITS INTEREST TO WISE AND WIDE ADOPTION OF IMMERSIVE LEARNING IN MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES
A prominent burden to VR in education is technological literacy. To bridge the gap between possibilities and learning, companies like 3D Organon in collaboration with Munfarid Global has introduced comprehensive learning programs in medical universities across the Middle East. Munfarid will focus on the implementation of programs in medical universities, so as medical trainees can visualize opportunities, derive readings and form new solutions, through this reformation in collaborative avatars of teaching atmosphere. By combining real and virtual environments, medical trainees can gain realistic readings and anticipate any patient’s life and death situations with circumstantial scenarios.

Surgical simulation can enhance the training process of medical aspirations as there is a broad disconnect in between combining cognitive and technical skills in the present models of simulation, adopted by a majority of medical universities.

Immersive Learning can become the essential bridge between healthcare practitioners and patients, as the virtual community creates a platform of wide exploration. All it requires is a dedicated implementation.

ABOUT 3D ORGANON:
3D Organon is the creative mogul behind the world’s first fully-featured VR anatomy atlas. The VR Anatomy allows medical aspirants to learn about the human body with full 3D female and male body models at the display which includes Connective, Skeletal, Muscular, Venous, Arterial, Nervous, Lymphatic, Respiratory, Heart, Digestive, Urinary, Endocrine, Reproductive, Integumentary, and Sensory organs.
3D Organon Website: https://www.3dorganon.com

ABOUT MUNFARID GLOBAL:
Munfarid focuses on providing intuitive and immersive learning opportunities to its clients across the Middle East. Creating strategic visions through benefits of ethos and innovative solutions, Munfarid has evolved as a regional and international participant in the global technological landscape.
Munfarid Website: https://munfarid.org/

ABOUT DR. SANA FARID:
Dr. Sana Farid, is a pioneer ARVR Strategist, a surgeon and Co-founder & CEO of Munfarid. She is a powerful, determined, and dedicated educational reformer who works towards implementing futuristic solutions for societal well-being. An acclaimed speaker, brilliant academician, and a simulation expert, Dr. Sana Farid has been featured amongst the top 100 women in Bahrain, Forbes, Entrepreneur, and Harvard Business Review in 2018. Her remarkable work is a highlight in the Middle East’s ARVR space, and now the world, as she contributes her valuable consultancy and insurgent technological solutions in supporting Governmental and non-Governmental initiatives. With her notable ambition in outlining the much-needed necessities of ARVR in the world, she has been credited extensively as a leader in MENA technological terrain. Her unparalleled dedication and consistency in uplifting healthcare and education standards with international contribution and implementation of innovative solutions in developing countries have inspired many. She has been awarded as an ambassador of women empowerment programs as well, which makes her the pinnacle of outstanding success.

Dr. Sana Farid
Munfarid Global
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Transformation of Healthcare through Immersive Technologies: by Dr. Sana Farid


Source: EIN Presswire

One in 10 people have ‘near-death’ experiences, according to new study

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

Mystical near-death experiences where people report a range of spiritual and physical symptoms, affect around 10 per cent of people.

Our central finding is that we confirmed the association of near-death experiences with REM sleep intrusion.”

— Dr Daniel Kondziella

OSLO, NORWAY, June 29, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Mystical near-death experiences where people report a range of spiritual and physical symptoms, including out-of-body sensations, seeing or hearing hallucinations, racing thoughts and time distortion, affect around 10 per cent of people, according to a new study that analysed participants from 35 countries.

These near-death experiences (NDEs) are equally as common in people who are not in imminent danger of death as in those who have experienced truly life-threatening situations such as heart attacks, car crashes, near drowning or combat situations.

The new findings were presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress by researchers from the Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, the Center for Stroke Research, Berlin, and the Norwegian University of Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Experiences most frequently reported by participants in their study included: abnormal time perception (87 per cent), exceptional speed of thought (65 per cent), exceptionally vivid senses (63 per cent) and feeling separated from, or out of their body (53 per cent).

The study group who reported NDEs variously described feeling at total peace, having their ‘soul sucked out’, hearing angels singing, being aware they were outside their body, seeing their life flashing before them, and being in a dark tunnel before reaching a bright light. Others spoke of being aware of another’s presence before they went to sleep, or of a demon sitting on their chest while they lay paralysed unable to move.

The team recruited 1,034 lay people from 35 countries via a crowdsourcing platform online (to eliminate selection bias) and asked them if they’d ever had an NDE. If they answered ‘yes’, they were asked for more details, using a detailed questionnaire assessment tool called the Greyson Near-Death Experience Scale, which asks about 16 specific symptoms.
A total of 289 people reported an NDE, and 106 of those reached a threshold of 7 on the Greyson NDE Scale, (which confirms a true NDE). Some 55 per cent perceived the NDE as truly life-threatening and 45 per cent as not truly life-threatening.

Far from being a pleasant experience associated with feelings of peacefulness and wellbeing, as some previous studies have reported, the new study found a much higher rate of people reporting their NDE as unpleasant. Overall, of all the people who claimed an NDE, 73 per cent said it was unpleasant and only 27 per cent said it was pleasant. However, in those with a score of 7 or above on the Greyson NDE Scale (a confirmed NDE), this changed to 53 per cent reporting a pleasant experience and 14 per cent an unpleasant one.

Based on insight gained from previous studies, the researchers found an association between NDEs and Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep intrusion into wakefulness. REM sleep is a phase of the sleep cycle where the eyes move rapidly, the brain is as active as when someone is awake, dreaming is more vivid, and most people experience a state of temporary paralysis, as the brain send a signal to the spinal cord to stop the arms and legs moving. When REM sleep intrudes into wakefulness, some people report visual and auditory hallucinations and other symptoms such as sleep paralysis, where they feel conscious but cannot move.

REM sleep intrusion on wakefulness was found to be more common in people with scores of 7 or above on the Greyson NDE Scale (47 per cent) than in people with scores of 6 or below (26 per cent), or in those below the threshold with no such experiences (14 per cent).

Lead researcher Dr Daniel Kondziella, a neurologist at the University of Copenhagen, said, “Our central finding is that we confirmed the association of near-death experiences with REM sleep intrusion. Although association is not causality, identifying the physiological mechanisms behind REM sleep intrusion into wakefulness might advance our understanding of near-death experiences.”

Dr Kondziella said that the 10 per cent prevalence figure of NDE was higher than in previous studies conducted in Australia (8 per cent) and Germany (4 per cent). He said this could be explained by the fact they had been conducted on cardiac arrest survivors rather than unprimed lay people, as in this study.

Dr Kondziella said the study replicated the findings of an earlier study by Nelson et al in 20062 that had been criticised for selectional bias, but the new study addressed those potential flaws by recruiting via a crowdsourcing platform.

ENDS

Press Enquiries:

For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 7732 499170.

Selected reports from participants with an experience that reached the threshold of ≥7 points on the 3 Greyson NDE scale to qualify as a near-death experience:

Female, 37 years, childbirth: “I felt like I just died, and I went to heaven. I heard voices, and I was sure I would not come back to my life. It was weird. I could not control my body.”

Female, 32 years, near-drowning: “I nearly drowned when I was around 8 years old. I felt total peace. Twenty years later I can still remember how I felt. It was an amazing feeling.”

About the Expert:
Dr Daniel Kondziella is a neurologist at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

EAN – The Home of Neurology:
The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology and will bring together more than 6,000 neurologists and related scientists to the biggest general neurology conference in Europe.

References:

1. Prevalence of near-death experiences in people with and without REM sleep intrusion. Presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress on Saturday, 29 June, 2019.

2. Nelson KR et al; ‘Does the arousal experience contribute to near death experience? Neurology 2006, April 11; 66(7); 1003-9 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16606911

Luke Paskins
European Academy of Neurology (EAN)
+44 7732 499170
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Source: EIN Presswire

MS patients at a greater risk of cancer, new study suggests

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

New results of a 65-year follow-up study of patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) suggest that patients may have a greater overall risk of developing cancer.

This research outlines the need for greater awareness of cancer risk among MS patients, which should lead to shortened cancer diagnosis and more effective therapy in order to improve outcomes.”

— Dr Nina Grytten

OSLO, NORWAY, June 28, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Presented today at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress in Oslo, Norway, the Norwegian study also indicated an increased risk of developing haematological cancers in non-MS siblings of MS patients, compared with both MS patients and the general population.

Cancer type Cancer risk among MS patients compared to the non-MS population

Respiratory cancer 66% increase in risk
Central nervous system (CNS) 52% increase in risk
Urinary cancer 51% increase in risk
Overall cancer 14% increase in risk

Table 1 – increase in cancer risk in MS patients compared to the non-MS population

This long-term analysis was based on patient records from 6,883 MS patients born between 1930–1979, who were registered with various Norwegian MS and Cancer Registries, and prevalence studies from Norway. The analysis also included data from 8,918 siblings without MS, and 37,919 non-MS individuals.

“This study is the first to compare cancer risk in MS with non-affected siblings of MS patients. The risk assessment between these two groups is extremely interesting because they share the same genetics and environmental conditions,” noted Dr Nina Grytten, lead researcher of the study, from Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, who presented the results at the EAN congress.

“Previous clinical studies of cancer risk in MS patients in various countries have shown inconsistent findings, so further research is needed to help improve our understanding in this area,” stated Dr Grytten. “This research outlines the need for greater awareness of cancer risk among MS patients, which should lead to shortened cancer diagnosis and more effective therapy in order to improve outcomes and survival.”

“Additional research could also identify the possible connections between haematological cancer and MS and new ways in which we could manage these conditions”, she added.

Multiple sclerosis is a lifelong disease that affects the central nervous system, especially the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. It can lead to a wide range of symptoms, including problems with vision, arm or leg movement, sensation or balance. MS is one of the most common causes of disability in younger adults8, and people with MS have on average 7 years shorter longevity.

Haematological cancer is a type of blood cancer that includes myeloma, lymphoma and leukaemia. There are many different types of haematological cancers, which can affect the blood, bone marrow and lymph nodes in the body. According to Dr. Grytten, the results of the investigation might suggest that MS and haematological cancer could share a common etiology, which can be important for future treatment of MS and prevention of both diseases.

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Press Enquiries:

For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 7732 499170.

About the Expert:

Dr Nina Grytten is from Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

EAN – The Home of Neurology:

The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. Founded in 2014, through the merger of two European neurological societies, EAN represents the interests of more than 45,000 individual members and 47 national institutional members from across the continent. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology and will bring together more than 6,000 neurologists and related scientists to the biggest general neurology conference in Europe.

In Oslo, Norway, from June 29 to July 2, there will be an exchange of knowledge and promotion of best practice, with a focus on the main theme of neuroinflammation. The EAN Congress will also cover all neurological diseases and disorders, including the big 7: epilepsy, stroke, headache, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement disorders, neuromuscular disorders.

References:

1. Cancer risk in multiple sclerosis patients, siblings, and healthy controls: a prospective, longitudinal cohort study, presented at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress in Oslo, Norway.
2. Marrie RA, Reider N, Cohen J, et al. A systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of cancer in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler. 2015 Mar; 21(3): 294–304.
3. Nielsen NM, Rostgaard K, Rasmussen S, et al. Cancer risk among patients with multiple sclerosis: a population-based register study. Int J Cancer 2006; 118: 979–984.
4. Söderberg KC, Jonsson F, Winqvist O, et al. Autoimmune diseases, asthma and risk of haematological malignancies: a nationwide case-control study in Sweden. Eur J Cancer. 2006; 42: 3028–3033.
5. Edwards LJ, Constantinescu CS. A prospective study of conditions associated with multiple sclerosis in a cohort of 658 consecutive outpatients attending a multiple sclerosis clinic. Mult Scler 2004; 10: 575–581.
6. Goldacre MJ, Seagroatt V, Yeates D, et al. Skin cancer in people with multiple sclerosis: a record linkage study. J Epidemiol Community Health 2004; 58: 142–144.
7. Lebrun C, Vermersch P, Brassat D, et al. Cancer and multiple sclerosis in the era of disease-modifying treatments. J Neurol 2011; 258: 1304–1311.
8. NHS. Multiple Sclerosis Overview. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/multiple-sclerosis/. Accessed June 2019).
9. Lunde HMB, Assmus J, Myhr KM, Bo L and Grytten N. Survival and cause of death in multiple sclerosis: a 60-year longitudinal population study. Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry. 2017; 88: 621-5
10. National Cancer Institute. Hematologic Cancer:
https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/hematologic-cancer. (Accessed June 2019).

Luke Paskins
European Academy of Neurology (EAN)
+44 7732 499170
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Source: EIN Presswire

The brain’s internal ‘GPS’ and time tracker provides valuable insight into Alzheimer’s disease, says Nobel Prize winner

5th Congress of the European Academy of Neurology

Insights into complex, space-mapping and time-tracking neural systems that help us make sense of our experiences may give insights into Alzheimer’s disease.

The discoveries of how the brain encodes space, time and memory is of great importance to clinical neuroscience and the global efforts to fight brain disease.”

— Professor Edvard Moser

OSLO, NORWAY, June 28, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Nobel laureate Professor Edvard Moser, from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, will inform attendees at the 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress in Oslo, Norway that the loss of ability to find one’s way, to keep track of time and to create and retrieve memories are all hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease and that a greater understanding of space and time mechanisms in the brain is of fundamental importance in neuroscience.

“The neural networks that generate space and time are the very first cells that start to die, perhaps decades before we notice clear symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease,” explained Professor Moser. “The discoveries of how the brain encodes space, time and memory is crucial to understanding how higher mental function is generated and of great importance to clinical neuroscience and the global efforts to fight brain disease.”

Professor Moser’s work on the breakthrough discovery of a positioning system in the brain, together with Dr May-Britt Moser and Professor John O’ Keefe of University College London, UK, was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2014 and will be the main focus of his presentation. The grid cells which Professor Moser discovered in 2005, are referred to as the brain’s own GPS system that generate regular hexagonal patterns that cover our spatial environment and give information about distances and directions.

Professor Moser says the brain has several special types of navigation cells, each with an identifiable function. For example, there are place cells in the hippocampus, grid cells and object-vector cells (2019) in the medial entorhinal cortex, which provide an alternative or complementary way for people to find their way around.

There are also other specialist ‘speedometer’ cells to gauge speed of travel, head direction cells that act like an internal compass, giving a sense of direction and border cells, which set off neural alarms to alert you if you are near to the edge of something.

“The discovery of the brain's positioning system represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of how ensembles of specialised cells work together to execute higher cognitive functions. It has opened new avenues for understanding other cognitive processes, such as memory, thinking and planning,” says Professor Moser.

In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex are frequently affected at an early stage, and these individuals often lose their way and cannot recognise their environment. Knowledge about the brain’s positioning system may, therefore, help with understanding the mechanism underpinning the significant spatial memory loss that affects people with this disease, Professor Moser will propose.

Professor Moser will also highlight the more recent discovery of a time code (2018) deep inside the brain that provides a sense of time in our experiences and memories.

Research carried out by Professor Moser and colleagues, including Albert Tsao, recorded the time signal from a neural network in the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC). Professor Moser said: “This time code does not actually care about absolute (clock) time. It cares about sequence. What happened first, then what, and the next thing, and after that, etc. Just like the narratives of experience we continuously weave to make sense of the world around us. We believe that this discovery will bring us one leap closer to solving the challenge of brain disease such as Alzheimer’s.”

Professor Moser concluded, “The neural clock for subjective time serves a critical function in memory and learning. It informs our ability to organise experiences as a succession of events, to form memories, to learn and also helps to shape who we are. The brain has specialised neural systems for encoding space, time and memory that we are now starting to uncover. The next exciting steps are to understand how hundreds, or thousands of neurons interact, in order to create the sense of space or time.”

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Press Enquiries:
For further information or to speak to an expert, please contact Luke Paskins or Hannah Murray at press@ean.org or call +44 (0) 7732 499170.

About the Expert:
Professor Edvard Moser is from the University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway.

EAN – The Home of Neurology:

The European Academy of Neurology (EAN) is Europe’s home of neurology. Founded in 2014, through the merger of two European neurological societies, EAN represents the interests of more than 45,000 individual members and 47 national institutional members from across the continent. This year, EAN celebrates its fifth year of fostering excellence in European neurology and will bring together more than 6,000 neurologists and related scientists to the biggest general neurology conference in Europe.

In Oslo, Norway, from June 29 to July 2, there will be an exchange of knowledge and promotion of best practice, with a focus on the main theme of neuroinflammation. The EAN Congress will also cover all neurological diseases and disorders, including the big 7: epilepsy, stroke, headache, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement disorders, neuromuscular disorders.

References:
1. The positioning system in the brain, Congress Opening Session, 5th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress1 in Oslo, Norway.
2. The Nobel Prize (2014): https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2014/press-release/
3. Integrating time from experience in the lateral entorhinal cortex, Nature (2018): https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0459-6
4. Object-vector coding in the medial entorhinal cortex, Nature (2019) https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1077-7

Luke Paskins
European Academy of Neurology (EAN)
+441444811099
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Source: EIN Presswire

Dr. Reef Karim, Prominent Brain Scientist, Chosen One of L.A.’s 100 Most Fascinating People for 2019

Dr. Reef Karim, Prominent Brain Scientist & Life Strategist

“We're honored to include Dr. Reef Karim into our BoLAA family.” ~Aurora DeRose

LOS ANGELES, CA, UNITED STATES, June 28, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Dr. Reef Karim, Prominent Brain Scientist & Life Strategist, has been chosen by the “Best of Los Angeles Award” community as one of L.A.’s 100 most fascinating people, according to Aurora DeRose, award coordinator for the “Best of Los Angeles Award” community.

“With all of Reef Karim’s incredible achievements in the field of medicine and wellness, it’s easy to see why he has earned a place on L.A.’s 100 Most Fascinating People list” said DeRose.

The “Best of Los Angeles Award” community was formed four years ago and consists of over 5,300 professional members living and working in Southern California. It celebrates the best people, places and things in Los Angeles with a slogan “No Ads. No B.S. Only the Best.”

“The mission of the community is to celebrate the best of Los Angeles, and allow its community members to connect with other members who share the highest standards of quality and integrity,” expresses DeRose. "We're honored to include Dr. Reef Karim into our L.A.’s 100 most Fascinating List."

Dr. Reef Karim, a leading expert in human behavior, has dedicated his life to educating, entertaining and helping people understand themselves better. He is a double board-certified psychiatrist, addiction medicine physician and relationship expert as well as a writer, host and media personality. He served as an Assistant Clinical Professor at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and founded a personal transformation and recovery outpatient treatment center in Beverly Hills for mental health, personal growth, toxic relationships and addiction recovery. (www.lumioncenter.com).

The good doctor is a highly sought-after speaker and is well known in the media with recurring appearances on: Oprah, Dr. Oz, CNN, Larry King Live, Dr Phil, Anderson Cooper 360, Nightline, The Today Show, Chelsea Lately and many others. He hosted the television shows Broken Minds on the Discovery Network, House of Clues on Court TV and Outrageous Acts of Psych on the Science Channel. Dr Reef also writes, produces, and hosts the new online late-night talk show Reef Madness where he breaks down the best and most controversial topics in human behavior.

Reef is the co-author of the dating psychology book “Why Does He Do That? Why Does She Do That?”, his literary work is frequently published in Forbes and Huffington Post and his research on human behavior has been published in many prestigious academic journals including, The International Journal of Neuroscience and The Journal of Addiction Medicine. He has a special interest in American Pain, Fame Addiction and The Neuroscience of the Self (www.fameaddict.com).

Also known as The Sex, Drugs & Relationships Doctor, Dr. Reef is all about self-expression. He believes “Laughter really is the best medicine,” and as such, has studied improvisation for years and performs stand-up at comedy clubs all over Los Angeles. With improv and performance training, he’s had the opportunity to act and consult in both Hollywood and Bollywood movies playing lead and supporting characters and he’s worked as the technical medical advisor on big feature films and television shows including: Private Practice, Alias, Bourne Identity and many others.

Dr. Reef recently founded a production company focused on developing content for new media, broadcast television, and independent film called Little Boy Big Suit Entertainment. Finally, for his work in medicine, advocacy, research and entertainment, he was voted one of People Magazine’s Sexiest Men Alive.

Aurora DeRose
Michael Levine Media
+1 310-396-6090
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire